Art and Entertainment

“Michael, put down your pencil and pay attention!” was a phrase commonly directed at me in elementary school. Being an obedient kid I would lay my pencil down and, my mind untethered, would quickly drift off into another realm. Stopping doodling was like letting go of the string of a balloon—the balloon being my ability to focus on the moment. 

I have been practicing photography for around twelve years, and I wanted to redirect my ‘visual culture’ to the context I am in, but it is not always easy to change focus.

This spring I was testing a distance art program for my day job in teen recreation. I found a set of watercolours I’d kept in a box since I went to Kootenay School of the Arts in Nelson in 2002.

I went to KSA to pursue my dream of being a writer. As an afterthought I picked Mixed Media as my second studio. In one short year, KSA lost its funding and both the Mixed Media and Writing programs ended.

Let’s not forget that the things we make are tools to connect us to ourselves and to our community. When we start looking at the tool as an end point, we start losing the human part. 

The Vogue Theatre Djonlich family, as featured in Kootenay Business Magazine, August 2018.

Ritchie’s most recent cinematic offering is The Gentlemen, which takes Ritchie back to his roots. It is a film about a mob war between two London gangsters, a marijuana dealer played by Matthew McConaughey and a heroin dealer played by Henry Golding.

Dave Richards loves to work with his hands to create things. He also really enjoy learning how something is done and challenging himself to see if he can do it. So, he experiments with different materials and techniques as a hobby. 

Last year I bought my first real camera; a lightly-used digital SLR. For years I had heard terms like ‘exposure’ and the ever-mysterious ‘f-stop,’ but they remained abstract concepts—the secret language used by photographers to work their magic.

While most of us haven’t been travelling much lately, many of us have occasion to be out of our normal calling area and need to make calls. Normally, not a big deal, but what if you have to make a bunch of long-distance calls?

This May, as we watched people take to the streets around the world to protest racism and police brutality, our little mountain town may have felt… quiet. But the reality is, the energy and rage was mounting. An impressive number of businesses and residents took part in #blackouttuesday, stepping away from social media, augmenting the stories and voices of those who need to be heard, showing they want to be an ally and part of the solution.